Pork Tenderloin Sous Vide

Why in the world would you ever need to sous vide a pork tenderloin? 

This question has come up quite a few times in the ten years I’ve been a sous vide practitioner. The answer is pretty straightforward: flavor and convenience.Tenderloin MarsalaAbove is thick sliced pork tenderloin with a Marsala cream sauce over brown rice. Cooked at 131°F for a mere seven hours, shocked to 70°F, then grilled for a few minutes, it’s marvelously tender and juicy. Continue reading

Sous Vide and Smoked Pork Shoulder

In my opinion, pork shoulder (aka pork butt) is one of the most versatile pieces of meat available these days.
Wonderful Mahogany Color!Above are some two(ish) pound chunks I’ve cut from the whole. Trimmed a bit, I’ve bound them with twine as a part of an unnatural act so they stay roundish during the sous vide processing — 135°F for a mere 10 hours. Once chilled, these went into the fridge to await additional attention. Continue reading

Beef: Sous Vide Top Sirloin

Posted by johngl

I’ll admit it: when I began this adventure, I didn’t know a whole lot about sirloin. I never paid much attention to it since my favorite cuts of beef were ribeye and porterhouse steaks, in that order. These “favorite” steaks come from primal cuts located mid-cow.  Sirloins hail from an area behind the short loin (where porterhouses call home) and in front of the “round” portion at the back end of the cow.

This is a representation of a cow!

Notice that tenderloin strip (white) whose big end (sometimes called the “head”) rests between two hunks of sirloin. The Top Sirloin (light green) rests directly beneath the “head” end of the tenderloin primal.

Below is seven and a half pounds of prime grade top sirloin. It cost me less than $5/lb, so I had no problem doing some experiments with it. It’s not easy to find a prime grade of anything at that price. My first run at it was a nine hour sous vide at 132°F.

Top Sirloin sous vide

I just love that edge to edge color that sous vide cooking brings.

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Sous Vide Beef Tenderloin: Revisited

Posted by johngl

It’s always difficult when great friends move away and this one is no exception. And, since I haven’t done a beef tenderloin for a long while, it seemed a proper way to contribute to their send-off.

Before I get all sniffly regarding their departure, let’s get to it.
Seared TenderloinNaturally, this looks like your basic grilled psoas major, that main muscle of the whole tenderloin that begets fillet mignon. Sadly, it doesn’t start out looking this pretty and one misses out on all that fun associated with raising, transporting, killing, butchering, packaging, more transporting, and selling to the public. We’ll pick it after the latter. Continue reading

48 Hour Sous Vide Chuck

It doesn’t happen often, but sometimes I can be inspired by something I’ve seen on the Internet. At this point, I don’t even remember what that inspiration was, but it was there once, I swear it.
Sous Vide Chuck
I’m a huge fan of the ultra-beefy taste of chuck. It’s what meat is meant to be. However, it can be a little chewy unless it’s cooked for long periods of time…like days.

Funny how this works, but sous-vide is just the ticket! A full 48 hours at 130°F did the trick. Continue reading

Sous Vide & Seared NY Strip Strips Sandwich and a Newfangled Old Fashioned

When I was hunting the fridge looking to bag something for lunch, this just jumped out in front of me:
Strips of NY Strip
Well, it wasn’t that exactly, it was a 3oz piece of sous vide NY Strip that most glorious spousal unit set aside for me. She’s thoughtful that way.

What to do, what to do?
Seared NY Strip Strips
I’d initially thought about a grilled cheese sandwich. Why not add some NY Strip strips?
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