July 4th Steak and Egg Breakfast

Posted by johngl

My good friend and fellow wine and food lover, BigDMcC, was coming over to join in on the second annual July 4 Paella Fest (stay tuned for tomorrow’s post) and, since we were going to have a big day of cooking ahead of us, I thought it best we start the day with a hearty breakfast of bone-in, grilled dry-aged ribeye, farm fresh eggs cooked in duck fat, and some duck bacon.  Oh, and an English muffin.  Sorry, I didn’t have any Texas Toast available.

Tasty Steak and Eggs

Not a bad way to start the day.

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Most Glorious Pot Roast

Posted by johngl

I just happened to have a big hunk of dry-aged chuck taking up space in the fridge when the most glorious spousal unit decided upon making a pot roast.  To be sure, she’s the queen of the slow-cooker and I wasn’t about to issue a protest. It didn’t hurt that we’re experiencing a damn serious cold-snap — courtesy of the bowels of the Arctic. There is a reason they call it comfort food.

Dry-aged chuck pot roast

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Wet and Dry Aging

Posted by johngl

About three weeks ago, another aging experiment was hatched.  I left a whole, unpeeled tenderloin in its cryovac packaging for two weeks.  Then I made the steaks found in the Grilled Beef Tournedos post. Those steaks were center cut and came out pretty darned good.

Two week wet-aged beef

I should have just stopped there, but I wanted to find out what would happen if I dry-aged the remaining pieces — a tail end, a head end, and the petites.

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Braised Dry-Aged Chuck

Posted by johngl

I buy large quantities of meat. For instance, last Friday, I picked up seven pounds of chuck, three of which went for sliders over at Charlie’s.  Obviously, I had four pounds left, so into my dry-aging fridge it went.  Several days later, we had some braised beef and potatoes for dinner.

braised beef and potatoes

This is about the easiest dish ever…

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Additional Dry Aging

Posted by johngl

Johngl, what do you mean, additional dry-aging? Isn’t that thing rotten yet?

Well, so far, since the Breaking Down a Primal Ribeye post, we have done some braised ribeye, braised beef and noodles, pan seared dry-aged ribeye with foie gras, and a Cheez Whiz Philly Cheesesteak, all from the same hunk o’meat. It’s not dead yet.

In real time, the meat has only aged two weeks. I know it seems longer, but in this case, the wonders of technology have delayed this posting.

Back to the matter at hand: comparing the week-old and two-week-old pieces, there are some considerable differences:

Pretty amazing change, eh?

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Pan Seared Dry-Aged Ribeye with Foie Gras

Posted by johngl

A couple of weeks ago, we were butchering out a ribeye primal and the bulk of the eye was reserved for additional week of dry-aging. We’re now going to pan-sear a couple of steaks cut from that “eye” and throw in some duck foie gras for good measure.

That is a patty of foie gras on the far left.  Just pretend that it is butter and lay it over the pearl cous cous (sometimes referred to as ‘Israeli’ cous cous) or just spread it on the bread.  It is already melting over the steak, so there is no need to add any more there.

The wine is a 2005 Revolution Shiraz from a sub-region called Seaview in the McLaren Vale region of South Australia.  I was looking for a “big” wine to go with the meatiness of the steak.  I wasn’t dissapointed.  This wine is huge, with big, prominent flavors and a 15% alcohol content.  Robert Parker rates this a 93 and says “…the knock-out 2005 Shiraz Revolution displays a full-bodied, beautifully pure style with plenty of blackberries, pepper, and spice. With terrific intensity, sweet tannin, adequate acidity, and plenty of glycerin…”

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